Marc Ambrosia

Share your life story with us.

My name is Marc Ambrosia. I’m a 22 year old singer/songwriter born and raised in Clayton, NJ. All my life I’ve had a song to sing, but growing up I just always thought that pursuing music wasn’t within the realm of possibility. I was surrounded by people who would profess to me, “it’s great to have dreams, but you need to go to college and get a real job.” When you’re young, you just nod in agreement and do as you’re told… at least I did. Fast forward to my sophomore year of high school, I was in the middle of taking the S.A.T. and I just felt this overwhelming anxiety because I knew I didn’t know anything on the test and deep down I knew I was never really cut out for the college life. I was in total freak out mode in my head. When I finally calmed down and continued on with the test, I had to read a short biography on the great Ella Fitzgerald. While reading about her life and how music seemed to make everything to click for her, I couldn’t help but relate to that. I finished reading the biography and then closed the test booklet without finishing the questions. For me, the test was over. I knew it was time to get serious about music. I started writing like a maniac, booking a heavy amount of shows, and started recording music for the first time. I haven’t looked back since. I knew music was always inside me, and it’s been music that pulls me back into focus, keeps me balanced, and propels me forward.

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Share your press release.

New Jersey artist, Marc Ambrosia. Marc is a 22 year old singer/songwriter who began writing songs at age 15 after the loss of his mother and then the loss of his best friend just 6 months later.

Born and raised in Clayton, NJ, Marc has been singing since age 5. Beginning with performing gospel music, Marc later ventured into rock music and now he’s diving into more natural territory with pop music. He’s also managed to bring his gospel trained vocals into the mix, making for a fusion of pop and soul in his latest 11 songs, which he’ll be releasing one by one over the next year. One song that’s already been released is “Let Me Be Your Secret” and now, Marc has released his debut music video for the track. Able to cut deep with lyrics and captivate with soul, Ambrosia is proving he’s pop music’s best kept secret. In an industry that focuses on tabloid rather than artistry, Ambrosia is committed to taking the high road. “It’s always disheartening to hear a kid say they want to make music and become a star,” Ambrosia explains, “for me, it’s never once been about hoping to take the world by storm and become superstar famous. It’s always been first and foremost about telling beautiful stories and making great art.” Ambrosia has a talent for writing catchy melodies, and a great ear for pop production. “If courage be the strength of love, fear shall be its promise”, Ambrosia sings of fighting past hesitation and fear of losing at love. In his debut music video we are taken on a journey of discovery through a crowded college party, a sunny forest walk, dancing on the rooftop in the city and on a train headed back to the same party where he first sees the girl who inspires his ‘secret’ smile.

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List the names of those that have assisted you so far in your music career and use this opportunity to thank them.

Jamie Myerson has helped me to turn my musical visions into life and I am eternally grateful for his friendship. Alicia Delacorza saw my performance and came up to me and quickly became an integral part of my career from managing press, ideas, and being a soundboard for all of my business ideas. She’s my co-pilot, she’s my secret weapon. Danielle Brusco is my closest friend, my confidant, and my eternal muse. Kitty Miller is one of those people in my life who became an unexpected friend and aren’t those the best kind? Kitty and I are kindred spirits in so many ways and her encouragement, and her candor is truly a gift to me. Finally, my greatest treasure in this life – my dad, Ronnie. Will he ever know just how much I love him, adore him, and think the world of him… god, I hope so!

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Narrate your experience while recording in the studio or while touring.

I’m a total studio junkie, can’t get enough of it. For me, recording a song is to take something imaginary and turn it into something real. Recording music is my favorite thing in the world. Being in the studio, exchanging creative ideas and letting imagination steer the process is the most fulfilling experience.  Are there times of uncertainty? Yes. Are there masterful moments? Indeed. Sometimes all those things are happening simultaneously. There’s no way to explain it. It’s the paradox of production and it works quite fine for me.

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Go into detail about your songwriting process.

Not a day goes by where I don’t have ideas. Eventually, I have enough ideas to throw a song together. Other times, a song just flows out of me and I have the idea and write the song within 15 minutes. Some songs are quick like that, some take weeks, months, even years. The lyrics usually come first.

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Brief us on what you have on the way for your fans out there.

2018 is going to be an exciting year! January will see the release of my next single, “One Step Back.” More songs to follow in the upcoming year.

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Tell us what you are doing to increase your fan base.

Increasing fan base is the most important responsibility an artist has from a business standpoint. The whole reason we write songs in the first place is for the masses to hear them, right? For me right now, I’m releasing a series of singles one by one and throwing out music videos to go along with them. Content is so important now. People may not come to your shows, but they might watch your music video and share it. If you’re lucky, maybe your video will draw them out to your show. Don’t underestimate content. This is a digital world now, embrace it.

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Tell us that point in time that you just feel like giving up on your music career.

I’ve never once thought about giving up on a career in music. Despite the many shady characters I’ve encountered, the dirty deals I’ve been victim of, and the many low-points along the way, I never wanted to give up. If you keep pushing yourself, surround yourself with people whose work you admire and celebrate each of your small victories along the way, giving up will never make sense. Don’t. Give. Up.

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Go into detail on how you make your instrumentation or melody.

After I write the lyrics, I take to GarageBand or my piano and start plunking out a demo, but occasionally I’ll think of a groove first and write to that. I’ll start singing words to the groove in my head and record that on my phone. Then I go to the studio and start recreating the recorded idea on real instruments.

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Tell us your complete understanding of music licensing.

Understanding ‘Music Licensing’ can be tricky and convoluted; however, as an artist, it’s one of the most important aspects of your career. Just think, every time you hear a song on the radio, or in a commercial, or in a film, that music is licensed. Attention all artists, copyright all of your work! ‘Poor man’s copyright’ NEVER holds up, go to your State Congress Copyright website and submit your work properly there. Another word to the wise, NEVER post any of your work until it is copyrighted. In addition to this, all artists should sign up with a Performance Rights Organization (PRO) such as BMI, ASCAP, or SESAC. These organizations work for you to ensure you are getting properly compensated for your songs when they are played or used in sync placements. There’s so much to learn about Copyright, PROs, and sync/publishing, so do your homework! I recommend reading some of Loren Weisman’s many articles on the subject to start!

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Tell us the best way to get in touch with you on social media.

marcambrosia.com is my official website and is the hub of my online presence. Besides that, I’m on Instagram, Snapchat, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

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Give us the links to your various stores.

iTunes

iTunes

 

Amazon

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Tell us your favourite genre of music.

My favorite genre of music is pop. Pop music done right has the power to embody an era. Years down the road a good pop song will remind you of a time in the past. It will take you right back to where you were when that song came out and remind you how much you loved and adored that time in your life.

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Tell us the subject matter of most of your songs.

Being the hopeless romantic that I am, I tend to write about love. The longing for love, the heartache of unrequited love, and the pursuit of true love. I’ve been lucky enough (or maybe not so lucky) to have a lot of experience to draw from. I take the relationships, the almost relationships, the trysts, and the yearning for the relationships I can’t have and turn them into song.

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Tell us all we need to know about this song.

I think ‘Let Me Be Your Secret’ is one of the catchiest songs I’ve ever written. It’s one of those songs where I woke up in the middle of a dead sleep, went downstairs, and wrote the song in about ten minutes. I love writing songs like that. It’s a song with a lot of longing in it. There’s the whole idea of forbidden love and loving someone despite consequences or ridicule. I like to think that if nothing else, people will take away from this song that they are never wrong to love someone. There’s also the idea of people cherishing their secrets more than anything else in the world. If you can find someone who loves you as much as they love their own secrets, you’ve maybe found something worth exploring? There’s been many times where I’ve met someone and have thought in the back of my mind, ‘please, let me be your secret.’ When that happens, that’s usually how I know I’ve fallen pretty hard for someone.

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Tell us what you think about digital distribution and streaming.

Digital distribution and streaming is everything to up and coming artists. If not for digital distribution and streaming, there would be a lot of artists out there who wouldn’t have a way to get their music heard and that would be a tragedy. People being able to buy your songs online is wonderful, streaming on the hand can sometimes tiptoe on dressed up piracy and that needs to be addressed. Streaming is a wonderful idea and for music listeners, it works. What we need know is to establish a way that streaming can work for artists and make sure they are getting properly compensated each time their material is streamed.

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Tell us various ways that artists can boost their revenue.

Boosting your revenue as an artist seems to become more and more impossible as time goes on, but there are ways. Right now, the money is in publishing and sync placement deals. No one makes money on live shows, streaming, or downloads anymore so try and get your songs into film soundtracks, TV shows, commercials, etc. Those placements go a long way and the residual checks you’ll get from those don’t hurt either. As a music listener, that’s honesty how I find most of the music I listen to. I’ll be watching a TV show and I’ll hear a song I like in the background. I’ll Shazam the song and then wind up falling in love with that artist. That happens to me all the time. Now, just imagine being the artist whose song gets in the soundtrack. You’re getting a nice check and gaining new fans like myself who watch the show and look up the song. If you want to boost your revenue in today’s structure, that’s a great start!

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Tell us your thought on self-training and going to educational institution to study music.

I think the age-old question for all musicians will forever be whether to enroll at a university or commit self-training. I think that’s a question each musician will have to answer for themselves. For me, I had to consider the ridiculous math prerequisites it would have involved and then the financial strain I would have found myself in. From that standpoint, it was a no-brainer. It was either go to school for four years or start making records. Financially, I never would never have been able to do both so right after high school, I started making records. It’s a choice that has allowed me to delve into an independent study of musicology that I have found most rewarding. If you’re not going to go to school for music, devote yourself to deeply researching all kinds of music from listening to it, attending concerts, and exploring online. You don’t have to have a college degree to be an artist. I know plenty of artists who went to school and later realized it was a waste of 4 years and almost a quarter of a million dollars if not more. On the flip-side, I’ve also encountered many artists who say they wouldn’t be the person or writer they are today if not for college. You have to feel yourself out and try and gage what it is; you need for your own artist health. As creative, we need to make sure every decision we make is honoring and/or enhancing our artistic health and our artistic integrity.

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Go on at length on what it takes to write a hit song.

To think there’s one tried and true formula for writing a hit song would be foolish. Be wary of anyone who tries to lead you down a path of tailoring your writing to be ‘hit worthy.’ There are too many variables now to be sure of a song’s destiny. All I can say is stay dedicated to creativity and not commerce. Find a solid groove and a hook that sticks in your head. Once you’ve gotten that far, see where it takes you.

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Tell us what you will buy if you want to build your own studio.

If you want to build your own studio, find an interface you like and learn it like your life depended on it. Whether it is Pro Tools, Logic, Abelton, FL Studio, learn it inside and out. Once you do that, you may discover like I did, that engineering is just not for you and that’s fine. Maybe, you’re more of a producer only. If that’s the case, play around in GarageBand and get your ideas mapped out and then find someone you love working with who can help take your little GarageBand ideas to the next level.

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Go on at length on what it takes to gain the attention of the audience while playing live.

To really capture an audience during a live show I think it’s most important to let the music do the work. As a performer, it’s your duty to make sure you and your band are kicking ass on every level and firing on all cylinders. Your songs should sound tight and your performance should be slick. Another big aspect of a good show is to not underestimate the power of mystique. Entice an audience by not being such an open book. Don’t be an “easy girl,” play hard to get. Make the audience WANT to learn about all the colors that make you unique. If you have great songs, the songs will let the audience into your world just enough to make them want more. Always keep them wanting a little more. And finally, don’t talk too much. Talking in between every song is too much and doesn’t leave much to the imagination. Find three or four interesting stories to spread throughout your set and then let the music do the rest.

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List your five favourite songwriters.

Emily Saliers, Christine McVie, Mree, Ryan Adams, Sade.

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List your five favourite music producers.

Jamie Myerson, Lindsey Buckingham, Mree, Rick Nowels, Mitchell Froom.

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Describe in details how you feel when you hear your song on the radio.

When I hear one of my songs on the radio I can’t help but go right back in my mind to when I wrote the song and all the memories of being in the studio recording it. For instance, when I heard “Let Me Be Your Secret” on the radio for the first time, I couldn’t help but think back to sitting in Chris D’Antonio’s living room in the summer of 2016 cutting the demo with him. It’s amazing to think of yourself working on a little lo-fi demo and then before you know it, it’s a finished piece that’s on the radio for the entire world to hear. I just hope people are listening!

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Describe your best mood to write a song.

For me, my ideal environment for songwriting is in my dark red writing room with tiered roman candles lit, my mac desktop dimly lit, and white gold Christmas lights that hang from the ceiling all year long. 3A.M right until the morning comes serves me well in that room. That’s exactly how and when “Let Me Be Your Secret” came to life.

 

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