Stories

Discuss your personality.

I’m quiet, and I think way too much. I have way too many interests, so it’s hard to put me in a box. I don’t know, I’m kinda socially awkward. I’m not good at small talk because I prefer having deep conversations.

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Brief us about you as a musician. 

I rap, but I’m trying to make music. If you listen carefully, most songs have an influence from several genres at once. The idea of a genre is helpful as a way to organize music into categories for conversation, but it’s all music. I have lots of influences, from Joy Division to Young M.A., from Paul Simon to Eminem. For example, I love the philosophical and neurotic lyrics of Ian Curtis, as much as I love the street level conversational lyrics of Young M.A.

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Go into details on what have changed in your life for choosing music as a career.

Music has always been a part of my life. I was writing songs and putting them up on Myspace as a teenager. I won two consecutive years of talent shows in high school (lol). I went to college, and I have a Masters in theological studies from Vanderbilt University. I was planning on being a professor of theology at a university. The timing never felt right for rapping though. I’m 29 now, and I feel like I have more to say now than I would have if I started pursuing music professionally in my late teens. Part of what I want to do is take what I’ve learned through school and translate it into songs and albums. I’m still teaching, but through my music now.

 

(As a footnote, I don’t see music merely as a mode for teaching or getting across a “message.” It’s more than that. Music is feeling oriented too. It makes our bodies want to dance or sleep or relax. Not every song has to be “meaningful” in a rational sense.)

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Tell us the benefits and drawbacks of choosing music as a career. 

I’m someone that gets bored doing the same thing every day, so I think a benefit is that it engages the creative aspect of my personality that always needs to have something new to do. The drawback is that people don’t understand. It’s awkward going to a party and telling people I rap, while everyone at the party is pursuing a professional career. Maybe it’s just in my head, but I low-key get the feeling people think I have a Peter Pan complex.

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Tell us how you will manage fame as an established artist.

That’s impossible to answer, but I’d maintain a close group of friends and family to keep me grounded and accountable.

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Elaborate on the story line of this song. 

The song is supposed to be an introduction or teaser to my music career. It’s the first song I’ve released professionally. It’s big. It’s raw. I wanted the first song I put out to be aggressive. It demonstrates what I’m capable of as a rapper. I think people will come back to it in a year or so and realize what I was going for in the context of the rest of my songs, and why I put it out first.

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Tell us means of connecting you and purchasing your music online. 

Follow me:

Twitter

 

Instagram

 

Sonic will be available on iTunes, Spotify, Tidal, and all streaming services on February 2nd.

 

My website will be live on February 2nd as well:

Website

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Let us know the greatest moment of your music career. 

So far, putting out Sonic is the greatest moment of my music career.

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Tell us the highest amount of money you have ever received from your music career and how it happened. 

None. At this point, I’ve only invested money into my music career but I haven’t earned anything – Yet!

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Discuss your experience pertaining live performances, gigs, shows and tours.

I’ve never toured, but I’ve performed at open mics.

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Tell us how you relate with your fans. 

I try to be personal and vulnerable with my fans.

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Tell us what you will like to change if you have the chance to turn back the hands of time.

Nothing. Every time I start to think like this, it spirals into wasted time feeling like shit about myself.

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Tell us the most important people that have boosted your music career and how you met them. 

My older brothers. I wouldn’t be making music if I hadn’t grown up around music and hip-hop.

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Brief us on what you have in mind before considering music as a career. 

I thought about Tupac a lot before I decided to pursue rap as a career. He’s someone who had something to say. I feel like I have something to say, and that’s why I rap.

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Discuss your good and bad experience in life. 

I love traveling. I went to Buenos Aires a few years ago, and it was just one of those moments in life when you feel like everything is perfect. I was on a class trip. Me and a friend went out the first night we were there and met this cool dude who showed us the local spots.

 

The funny thing is, right around the same time I had a mental health breakdown before my second year of grad school. Mostly it had to with some drama related to a girl I was talking to. My life was out of balance, and I was repressing the creative part of my personality. I started making music as a form of therapy for myself after this.

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Name the artists that have influenced the world. 

Tupac, Bob Marley, Michael Jackson, Joy Division, Paul Simon, Eminem, Wu-Tang, Atmosphere, Hank Williams. There’s too many to name!

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Tell us about your moment of rejections as a musician and how you are able to cope and move on. 

Me and my producer go back and forth about our opinions of how a song should sound. There are been times when we yell at each other, but it’s all part of the process. We are mostly on the same page at this point. My skin has become much thicker in the process, and I’ve become a better lyricist in light of his critiques.

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Tell us the most negative comment you have ever received about your music. 

Nothing comes to mind at this point. Lots of people have issues with my delivery; they say it lacks energy and emotion. Some people love my delivery though. It’s all so subjective. I take every critique to heart and try to improve.

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Tell us how to become a famous artist. 

I subscribe to the idea that good music rises. It’s important to be consistent in putting out music, performing, and building a relationship with your fans, especially on social media.

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Tell us how you plan to make an impact on the society. 

I see my music itself as my way of making an impact on society. If I can help someone cope with their day, I’m happy.

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Elaborate on the recording process of this song.

I wrote “Sonic” around the time the Chicago Cubs won the world series. There was a feeling of pride around Chicago. You could see it in people’s eyes, wherever you went. I think this song conveys that emotion.

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State the official date of release.

“Sonic” was released on January 19th, 2018. It will be available on streaming services on February 2nd, 2018.

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